Funeral of Francois Arago

Fields of Astronomy

Astronomy / January 28, 2017

Even with the success and revelatory power of that image, it was still viewed as a very risky thing of possibly dubious value to commit many more HST orbits and staff time and effort to try a significantly even deeper field. STScI’s then-Director Bob Williams convened a panel of community experts who debated whether such a thing should be attempted, and if so, what type of field should be targeted. The idea that something should initially be tried in a generic, nominally empty deep field eventually came to the fore, but it was still seen as a possibly big gamble that might not live up to its potential for the great amount of time required. It took a courageous decision by Williams to go ahead with the project, committing a significant portion of his Director’s Discretionary time to the project.

A number of people rightly felt that they already had significant work of their own which needed pursuing and finishing and, when asked if they would be willing to take part in this original HDF experiment, declined. However, there were still some relatively few of us who had been discussing the possibilities of this informally. In my own case, having helped design and set up the SM1 ERO observations of CL0939+4713, I was eventually asked if it was technically feasible for us to even attempt such deep field observations.

In 1998, the Hubble Deep Field-South targeted a quasar with both imaging and spectroscopy, and included many more flanking fields and much deeper parallel observations—all in multiple cameras spanning wavelengths from long UV to infrared, including both the newer Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) instruments, as well as WFPC2. Even today, I think these HDF-South observations have been underutilized, although they have now been targeted by, for example, the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory. This underutilization came as the community gravitated more to observations of another southern-hemisphere field, the Chandra Deep Field-South, which by then had deeper X-ray observations. Hopefully the HDF-South and its Flanking Fields will still be exploited more fully in the future.

Astronauts installed the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) in 2002. Under then-Director Steve Beckwith, we designed the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (in the middle of the Chandra Deep Field-South) around use of the ACS and using WFPC2 and NICMOS in parallel, creatively making the pure parallel operational system give us the then-deepest-ever detailed UV and infrared observations.

All of this gives context to the observations which we have just recently finished: the Hubble Frontier Fields. Again convening a panel of community experts, and building on the success of large observing programs such as CLASH and CANDELS, STScI’s then-Director Matt Mountain explored a brilliant idea to use the gravitational lensing effect of massive galaxy clusters to magnify galaxies in the early universe beyond them, and to also provide a baseline for searches for higher-redshift supernovae. The plan was to come as close as is possible for Hubble to come to the bread-and-butter observations of the much-anticipated, soon-to-be launched James Webb Space Telescope in searching for some of the earliest galaxies in the distant, early universe.

The panel recommended that a group of six galaxy clusters and six adjacent parallel fields be targeted. That was a very important development, because it also addressed in a major way a phenomenon known as cosmic variance. In this phenomenon, the large-scale structure of the universe affects observations, so that a measurement of any region of sky may differ from a measurement of a different region of sky by a considerable amount. Because the size of the fields of view of Hubble’s cameras are roughly the size of a grain of sand held at arm’s length, we’re talking about deep line-of-sight “pencil beams” in the sky when we talk about these deep fields. With the superb resolution of Hubble’s cameras, incredible detail is attained, and we can see thousands of galaxies in unprecedented detail all across their fields of view.

But given what we now know about the larger-scale structure of the universe, when it comes to the matter which we can detect, at least, there are longer filaments and areas where they intersect, and voids in between. Sometimes, the small field of view of a camera may land on a filament of galaxies, and other times in a void between filaments, or partly on a filament and partly off. Therefore, the more deep fields we observe in various different places around the sky, the more we statistically beat down the perhaps unusual or anomalous statistical effects of any one particular local environment in the area of that particular deep field as we attempt to identify the more general nature of the universe across filaments and voids, etc.

A major feature of the Hubble Frontier Fields program is the use of two fields in parallel, on-cluster and off-cluster, for each of the galaxy clusters targeted in the program, giving us both a cluster-centric and a generic parallel field at some much larger distance away from the cluster, for each cluster. So, in effect, we get 12 fields for the price of six. Six on-cluster fields are dominated by each galaxy cluster’s environment—something very different from a traditional deep field in terms of the physics and dynamics affecting its galaxies, and also somewhat peculiar to that cluster— and six are off-cluster, parallel fields that contain thousands of field galaxies not particularly in any cluster environment. Given the relatively small angular size of each individual parallel field, this larger number of parallel fields especially helps to minimize the effects of cosmic variance when measurements from all other similar deep fields are combined or considered together.

Source: frontierfields.org